Plant Library


Our Plant Library of over 1,900 plants provides you with reliable information and photos. Please note that it is intended as a resource; it is not a current inventory list. Click here to view our current Plant Availability List.

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#1 Abeliophyllum distichum
Abeliophyllum_distichum-001
Common Name: Forsythia, White

Stiff and upright growing when young, developing arching branches and more symmetry with age. Clusters of fragrant white flowers in April along the stems before the leaves appear. Blooms concurrently with and is an alternative to Forsythia. Best when sited against a dark background.



#2 Abies concolor
Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFindermobot.org
Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFinder
mobot.org
Common Name: Fir, White

Pyramidal. Long, soft, bluish green needles. Suitable for city conditions: withstanding heat, drought and cold. The only Abies tolerant of air pollution. Native to the Rocky Mountains and adaptable for New England. Prefers acidic, moist but well drained soils.



#3 Abies fraseri
Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFindermobot.org
Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFinder
mobot.org
Common Name: Fir, Fraser

Narrow and pyramidal with glossy dark needles. Similar to the northern Balsam Fir but better adapted to our climate. Native to the Allegheny Mountains. Firs are generally well adapted to New England. They prefer acidic but moist well drained soils and benefit from cooler temperatures. Relatively intolerant of air pollution, they are not well suited to city conditions with the exception of A. concolor.

Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFindermobot.org Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFindermobot.org


#4 Abies koreana
Abies_koreana-001
Common Name: Fir, Korean

Narrow, upright, fast growing and dense. Thick glossy needles with distinctive silvery white undersides. Attractive and reliable for New England landscapes. Firs are generally well adapted to New England. They prefer acidic but moist well drained soils and benefit from cooler temperatures. Relatively intolerant of air pollution, they are not well suited to city conditions with the exception of A. concolor. Cary Award Winner. Starting in 1997 the Cary Award annually recognizes underutilized woody plants especially appropriate for New England that offer superior landscape appeal in two or more seasons, are winter hardy in zone 5 or colder, are pest resistant and are readily available in the market.



#5 Abies lasiocarpa arizonica
Abies_lasiocarpa_arizonica-001
Common Name: Fir, Cork

Narrow pyramid, similar in appearance to Blue Spruce. Grows less than a foot a year. Soft, heavy-textured deep blue needles. Thick white corky bark when mature. Native to the mountains of the northwest USA. Has performed well in Hopkinton for 40 years. Firs are generally well adapted to New England. They prefer acidic but moist well drained soils and benefit from cooler temperatures. Relatively intolerant of air pollution, they are not well suited to city conditions with the exception of A. concolor.



#6 Abies procera (nobilis) ‘Glauca’
Abies_procera_(nobilis)_Glauca-001
Common Name: Fir, Blue Noble

Slow growing and spreading when young, forming a large upright tree with downward arching branches when mature. Soft, curved, heavy-textured deep blue needles wrap the stems. Many cones. Firs are generally well adapted to New England. They prefer acidic but moist well drained soils and benefit from cooler temperatures. Relatively intolerant of air pollution, they are not well suited to city conditions with the exception of A. concolor.



#7 Acer campestre
Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFindermobot.org
Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFinder
mobot.org
Common Name: Maple, Hedge or Field

Dense, low-branched, rounded form. Vibrant yellow autumn color. Tolerates dry, compacted, and alkaline soils and will grow in clay.



#8 Acer ginnala (tataricum ginnala) ‘Compactum’
Image Coming Soon
Common Name: Maple, Amur

A vigorous but compact growing form of the multistemmed tree with denser branching than the species. Small green leaves turn brilliant scarlet in autumn. This species is native to China and Japan, among the hardiest of the maples, and well suited to landscaping in New England.



#9 Acer ginnala (tataricum ginnala) ‘Ruby Slippers’
Image Coming Soon
Common Name: Maple, Amur

Abundant winged seeds resemble a pair of bright red ballet slippers, June. Round, dense head. Bright red, orange and gold autumn foliage. This species is native to China and Japan, among the hardiest of the maples, and well suited to landscaping in New England.



#10 Acer griseum
Acer_griseum-001
Common Name: Maple, Paperbark

Upright growing small tree with bold, stocky branches, maturing to a rounded form. Unique cinnamon-brown bark exfoliates on trunk and branches to reveal a shiny coppery inner bark. Small three-lobed leaves are rich green in summer and bright coral-red in fall. A superior tree native to central China and becoming one of the choicest for this region, particularly striking in the winter garden. Chosen as the 2003 Cary Award winning tree. Starting in 1997 the Cary Award annually recognizes underutilized woody plants especially appropriate for New England that offer superior landscape appeal in two or more seasons, are winter hardy in zone 5 or colder, are pest resistant and are readily available in the market.

Acer_griseum-004 Acer_griseum-003 Acer_griseum-002 Acer_griseum-001


#11 Acer japonicum ‘Filicifolium’
Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFindermobot.org
Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFinder
mobot.org
Common Name: Maple, Japanese
Synonym: 'Aconitifolium'

A sturdy, broad, upright multistemmed tree with stout twigs and branches. Wide, deeply divided leaves are deep green in summer and brilliant scarlet shades in autumn. Stiff red twigs are prominent all winter. Easy to grow and one of the most distinctive and choice of the Japanese Maples.



#12 Acer japonicum ‘Green Cascade’
Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery
Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery
Common Name: Maple, Full Moon Japanese

Vigorous, weeping specimen tree. Deeply cut, lacy green foliage turns a marvelous red-orange in autumn. Full sun.

Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery


#13 Acer palmatum
Acer_palmatum-001
Common Name: Maple, Japanese

Vigorous, upright habit when young broadening with age. Multistemmed with green stems and leaves. Bright autumn color. Few plants can compare to the effect these choice cultivars create in the landscape. In winter the branching patterns are delicate and intricate with bold upward arching trunks and weeping stems. Autumn foliage is colorful, and even the fallen leaves are attractive on the ground. Easy to grow, reasonably winter tolerant and slow to mature, these cultivars are suitable for virtuallly any southern New England garden. Most perform best in partial shade, and they are ideal as understory trees. Foliage colors tend to be more pronounced with higher light intensity. We recommend vigilance against vole or rodent damage to stems when snow covers the trunks in winter.



#14 Acer palmatum ‘Beni Schichihenge’
Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery
Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery
Common Name: Maple, Japanese

Narrow, upright. Green foliage with white-coral-pink-orange margins, deep red branch tips. Few plants can compare to the effect these choice cultivars create in the landscape. In winter the branching patterns are delicate and intricate with bold upward arching trunks and weeping stems. Autumn foliage is colorful, and even the fallen leaves are attractive on the ground. Easy to grow, reasonably winter tolerant and slow to mature, these cultivars are suitable for virtually any southern New England garden. Most perform best in partial shade, and they are ideal as understory trees. Foliage colors tend to be more pronounced with higher light intensity. We recommend vigilance against vole or rodent damage to stems when snow covers the trunks in winter.

Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery


#15 Acer palmatum ‘Bloodgood’
Acer_palmatum_Bloodgood-001
Common Name: Maple, Japanese

This cultivar holds its red foliage color all summer and has become the industry “standard.” When not planted in full sun, its leaves turn bronzy red as the season progresses. Brilliant red fall foliage. Few plants can compare to the effect these choice cultivars create in the landscape. In winter the branching patterns are delicate and intricate with bold upward arching trunks and weeping stems. Autumn foliage is colorful, and even the fallen leaves are attractive on the ground. Easy to grow, reasonably winter tolerant and slow to mature, these cultivars are suitable for virtually any southern New England garden. Most perform best in partial shade, and they are ideal as understory trees. Foliage colors tend to be more pronounced with higher light intensity. We recommend vigilance against vole or rodent damage to stems when snow covers the trunks in winter.

Acer_palmatum_Bloodgood-001 Acer_palmatum_Bloodgood-002


#16 Acer palmatum ‘Butterfly’
Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFindermobot.org
Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFinder
mobot.org
Common Name: Maple, Japanese

Distinctly upright growing and twiggy. Delicate green ribbon-like leaves with white and pink margins, often variable branch to branch. Reversions to wider leaves should be removed. Yellowish foliage in fall. Slightly less winter tolerant than other cultivars and best sited in an area protected from winter winds. Requires annual maintenance for best appearance in this climate. We recommend vigilance against vole or rodent damage to stems when snow covers the trunks in winter.



#17 Acer palmatum ‘Crimson Prince’
Image Coming Soon
Common Name: Maple, Japanese

Upright with arching branches. Deep purple-red foliage turns red in autumn. Faster growing than ‘Bloodgood’. Few plants can compare to the effect these choice cultivars create in the landscape. In winter the branching patterns are delicate and intricate with bold upward arching trunks and weeping stems. Autumn foliage is colorful, and even the fallen leaves are attractive on the ground. Easy to grow, reasonably winter tolerant and slow to mature, these cultivars are suitable for virtually any southern New England garden. Most perform best in partial shade, and they are ideal as understory trees. Foliage colors tend to be more pronounced with higher light intensity. We recommend vigilance against vole or rodent damage to stems when snow covers the trunks in winter.



#18 Acer palmatum ‘Emperor I’
Acer_palmatum_Emperor_I-001
Common Name: Maple, Japanese

Leaves are large like those of ‘Bloodgood’ but with slightly more purplish pigment. Holds color well in heat. Faster growing than ‘Bloodgood’. Full sun to part shade.



#19 Acer palmatum ‘Katsura’
Weston Nurseries
Weston Nurseries
Common Name: Maple, Japanese

Slow growing, dense and compact. One of the first Japanese Maples to leaf out each spring. The small, five-lobed leaves emerge pale yellow-orange, with brighter orange margins. Rich green summer foliage changes again to bright yellow-orange in the fall. Adaptable to Bonsai culture. Few plants can compare to the effect these choice cultivars create in the landscape. In winter the branching patterns are delicate and intricate with bold upward arching trunks and weeping stems. Autumn foliage is colorful, and even the fallen leaves are attractive on the ground. Easy to grow, reasonably winter tolerant and slow to mature, these cultivars are suitable for virtually any southern New England garden. Most perform best in partial shade, and they are ideal as understory trees. Foliage colors tend to be more pronounced with higher light intensity. We recommend vigilance against vole or rodent damage to stems when snow covers the trunks in winter.

Weston Nurseries Weston Nurseries


#20 Acer palmatum ‘Orange Dream’
Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery
Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery
Common Name: Maple, Japanese

New growth in spring and into summer is a unique, bright orange-yellow. Few plants can compare to the effect these choice cultivars create in the landscape. In winter the branching patterns are delicate and intricate with bold upward arching trunks and weeping stems. Autumn foliage is colorful, and even the fallen leaves are attractive on the ground. Easy to grow, reasonably winter tolerant and slow to mature, these cultivars are suitable for virtually any southern New England garden. Most perform best in partial shade, and they are ideal as understory trees. Foliage colors tend to be more pronounced with higher light intensity. We recommend vigilance against vole or rodent damage to stems when snow covers the trunks in winter.



#21 Acer palmatum ‘Osakazuki’
Acer_palmatum_Osakazuki-001
Common Name: Maple, Japanese

Round-topped small tree. Green leaves in spring and summer with intense crimson fall color. Larger leaves are more sun tolerant than most Japanese Maples. Few plants can compare to the effect these choice cultivars create in the landscape. In winter the branching patterns are delicate and intricate with bold upward arching trunks and weeping stems. Autumn foliage is colorful, and even the fallen leaves are attractive on the ground. Easy to grow, reasonably winter tolerant and slow to mature, these cultivars are suitable for virtually any southern New England garden. Most perform best in partial shade, and they are ideal as understory trees. Foliage colors tend to be more pronounced with higher light intensity. We recommend vigilance against vole or rodent damage to stems when snow covers the trunks in winter.



#22 Acer palmatum ‘Senkaki’
Acer_palmatum_Senkaki-001
Common Name: Maple, Coralbark
Synonym: 'Sango kaku'

Distinctive red-coral colored bark, particularly striking in winter. Green foliage turns bright yellow in fall. Less cold and wind tolerant than other cultivars, requiring a protected planting location and annual maintenance. The effect of the bark is unsurpassed and worth the extra effort. Few plants can compare to the effect these choice cultivars create in the landscape. In winter the branching patterns are delicate and intricate with bold upward arching trunks and weeping stems. Autumn foliage is colorful, and even the fallen leaves are attractive on the ground. We recommend vigilance against vole or rodent damage to stems when snow covers the trunks in winter.



#23 Acer palmatum ‘Shigatatsu sawa’
Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery
Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery
Common Name: Maple, Japanese

Slow growing and wide. Reticulated yellow-green leaves with dark green veins all summer, turning reddish in fall. Few plants can compare to the effect these choice cultivars create in the landscape. In winter the branching patterns are delicate and intricate with bold upward arching trunks and weeping stems. Autumn foliage is colorful, and even the fallen leaves are attractive on the ground. Easy to grow, reasonably winter tolerant and slow to mature, these cultivars are suitable for virtually any southern New England garden. Most perform best in partial shade, and they are ideal as understory trees. Foliage colors tend to be more pronounced with higher light intensity. We recommend vigilance against vole or rodent damage to stems when snow covers the trunks in winter.



#24 Acer palmatum ‘Shindeshojo’
Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery
Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery
Common Name: Maple, Japanese

Wide growing, upright. Leaves are small, emerge bright red pink in spring and become reddish green with occasional flecks of white by summer. Red and orange fall foliage. Few plants can compare to the effect these choice cultivars create in the landscape. In winter the branching patterns are delicate and intricate with bold upward arching trunks and weeping stems. Autumn foliage is colorful, and even the fallen leaves are attractive on the ground. Easy to grow, reasonably winter tolerant and slow to mature, these cultivars are suitable for virtually any southern New England garden. Most perform best in partial shade, and they are ideal as understory trees. Foliage colors tend to be more pronounced with higher light intensity. We recommend vigilance against vole or rodent damage to stems when snow covers the trunks in winter.

Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFindermobot.org Randall C. Smith, Courtesy of Iseli Nursery


#25 Acer palmatum atropurpureum ‘Oshio Beni’
Acer_palmatum_atropurpureum_Oshio_Beni-001
Common Name: Maple, Japanese

Foliage light red all summer, turning brilliant scarlet-red in autumn. Best summer foliage color requires full sun. Few plants can compare to the effect these choice cultivars create in the landscape. In winter the branching patterns are delicate and intricate with bold upward arching trunks and weeping stems. Autumn foliage is colorful, and even the fallen leaves are attractive on the ground. Easy to grow, reasonably winter tolerant and slow to mature, these cultivars are suitable for virtually any southern New England garden. We recommend vigilance against vole or rodent damage to stems when snow covers the trunks in winter.